Installing Ansible on Ubuntu

The easiest way to get the latest version of Ansible consistently is to not depend on the OS repositories (i.e. homebrew or apt) but rather through PIP.

Install the development tools

sudo apt-get install python-dev python-setuptools build-essentials

With that install, you should get easy_install as well

Install PIP

sudo easy_install pip

Now with PIP installed, you can quickly install Ansible

sudo pip install ansible

I found that I needed to install python-dev and build-essentials to compile any of the necessary files

Hope this helps!

 

Installing KVM on Ubuntu

Over the years, I’ve tried a number of virtualization engines but I’ve recently settled for KVM for the home. Virtualbox is great for a desktop but KVM is extremely light and has all the features I look for when it comes to a server version for the home. Here are my install steps to install KVM on Ubuntu

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Setting up WordPress on Ubuntu

Lately I’ve been finding myself installing WordPress sites for numerous reasons. WordPress is a shocking versatile web site framework built on PHP if you just want to publish content extremely quickly. There’s typically a plug-in for any function that you’re looking for. In order to run WordPress on Ubuntu, you’ll need to do the following things:

Setup PHP

  1. Install PHP

Setup the database server

For instructions of how to manage MySQL, check out my MySQL cheatsheet

  1. Install MySQL
  2. Install the MySQL module for PHP on the web server
    sudo apt-get install libapache2-mod-php5
  3. Create a new user
  4. Create a new database
  5. Give the user access to the database

Set up the Web Server component

  1. Install Apache
  2. Download the latest version of WordPress anduncompress it
    sudo wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz
    tar -xvf latest.tar.gz
    
  3. Move your site to a new directory and give your Apache user access to that directory
    sudo mkdir /
    sudo cp -r wordpress //
    sudo chown -R www-data:www-data //
    
  4. Create an Apache configuration file for your site
    sudo nano /etc/apache2/sites-available/.conf
  5. Paste the following into yourconfig file and save it
    <VirtualHost *>
        DocumentRoot "//wordpress"
        ServerName 
        <directory "="" <directory="" name="" wordpress"="">
            Options Indexes FollowSymLinks MultiViews
            AllowOverride All
            Require all granted
        
    
  6. Enable the configuration
    sudo a2ensite .conf
  7. Enable the appropriate Apache mods
    Enable rewrite for pretty permalinks

    sudo a2enmod rewrite
  8. Reload Apache
    sudo service apache2 reload

Assuming you’ve already set up your DNS settings to point to the right server, you should be able to get started with setting up the site. When you go to http://, you should be able to start setting up the site.

These instructions work on the following configurations:

  • Ubuntu 14.04 and Apache 2.4

 

Installing Pentaho Business Analysis Server on Ubuntu

I’ve been experimenting with Pentaho for the past few months to find an easy way to present users with a simple to manage reporting system. The components I’ve been playing with are the Business Analysis Server (Reporting front end), Kettle and Spoon (ETL tool), Reporting Studio and Mondrian (OLAP Server). Here are the install steps that I used to install Pentaho Business Analysis Server on Ubuntu.

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Installing Ruby on Rails on Ubuntu

I decided to install Ubuntu 13.10 on my current desktop to compare developing on Ubuntu versus OS X. As I needed to install Rails as well I decided to document the steps for future reference as well.

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Install Plex Server on a Ubuntu Server

To complement Henry’s post on installing Plex on a Ubuntu Desktop, I decided to install Plex on a Ubuntu Server. The major benefit for using a Ubuntu Server is that it requires less memory and the Plex web interface is powerful making it quite viable to manage it without a desktop interface. The install steps for Plex on Ubuntu is also extremely painless. My Plex server is installed on a KVM virtual machine and connects to its media to my FreeNAS via NFS.

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Installing Ruby on Rails 3.0 on Ubuntu

I decided to spin up a Rails environment on Ubuntu 12.04 desktop as I wanted to isolate a testing problem. Looks like it was an environment issue on my desktop :D.

  1. Update your package repository
    type sudo apt-get update
  2. Install git and curl
    type sudo apt-get install git curl
  3. Install RVM and Dependencies
    type curl -L get.rvm.io | bash -s stable to download the latest rvm scripts
    type source ~/.rvm/scripts/rvm to load the RVM
    type rvm requirements to get the OS dependent files
    type sudo apt-get install build-essential openssl libreadline6 libreadline6-dev curl git-core zlib1g zlib1g-dev libssl-dev libyaml-dev libsqlite3-dev sqlite3 libxml2-dev libxslt-dev autoconf libc6-dev ncurses-dev automake libtool bison subversion pkg-config from the rvm requirements output
  4. Install Ruby 1.9.3
    type rvm install 1.9.3
    type rvm use 1.9.3 — default to set the default version of ruby for the machine
  5. Install Node.js – a Javascript engine
    type sudo apt-add-repository ppa:chris-lea/node.js – add a private repository
    type sudo apt-get update – update repository
    type sudo apt-get install nodejs – install nodejs as the Javascript Engine
  6. Install Rails
    type gem install rails