Tag Archives: r1f

Asus R1F – A Second Life

Although I really love my Macbook, there are certain aspects of my Asus R1F tablet that I really miss. The biggest one, of course, is the ability to use the tablet function. While I type a lot of things, I actually write and draw just as much. The only difference is that most of it is done on paper and they never get transferred to anywhere else and often times I lose them too. While I have my handy dandy tgrmobile (HTC Fuze) with me close to 100% of my waking hours, there are a few shortcomings to it. The first is that it’s a phone. When I type information with it during meetings, the assumption is that I am texting someone or emailing someone. It does have Evernote on it but the reality is that it is too small to be truly useful to write lots of notes or jott down my ideas fully with it. So lately I’ve been thinking a lot about going back to the Asus R1F or purchasing an Asus T91 to solve this issue. There were quite a few things that frustrated me about the Asus R1F, most of them stemming from using Windows Vista. When it was announced that Windows 7 would be released, I decided to give it another go. Although my initial install of Windows 7 RC was quite disastrous, the RTM seems much more solid. Here are some of my notes about setting up the Asus R1F with Windows 7.

 
Tablet functionality
After installing Windows 7, one of the things that I quickly noticed about my install was that I didn’t seem to have the tablet functionality. That will be fixed after the Intel 965 drivers were updated
 
Screen Rotation
This took a little bit more research but after doing some reading the answer was to install the Vista ATK Hotkey Utility for the Asus R1E. Yes, that’s not a typo. For the most part, most R1E software and drivers should work with the R1F. This is one such case.
August 13th, 2009
Biometric security
I’ve been slowly starting to use the tablet more and more and I finally got around to looking into the biometric feature for the R1F. When you install Windows 7 the first time, it will download an updated biometric driver. I actually found that it wouldn’t work properly. After some digging and testing, I found that the best way of getting this to work was to install the drivers that are available on the Upek site followed by installing the Protector Suite software after. Both will require reboots. Once Protector Suite is installed, go through the steps to activate it. In my case, I had to the Biometric Device Centre to enable domain security for biometric.
I’ll continue to update this post as I come across more fixes for the install.

 

Asus is Awesome

For
those of you who have been following my Tweets, you might remember my
complaints about a green line appearing on the screen of my Asus R1F.
This generally happens, especially with LCD screens. Anyway, I was
debating whether or not to take the opportunity to pick up an R1E but
there isn't enough of an incentive to pick one since the hardware specs
are about the same. So I opted to try to fix it.

So I called
Asus in the afternoon, from my phone number they were able to confirm
my asset and contact info. They emailed me my RMA number without even
having to ask me for my email. CRM at its best. How amazing is that.
One of the major benefits of buying an Asus notebook is that the repair
centre is a 10 minute drive from me. When I dropped off my notebook,
the technician did a quick assessment and said that it would take a
couple hours to fix. That came as a surprise. My previous experience is
that it typically takes around 3 days. I was pleasantly surprised when
I got a call in about an hour to say my notebook was fixed.

I
have 3 Asus notebooks now and have had to do warranty repairs on all of
them to date. Most of them were human fault rather than manufacturing
fault (i.e. Niece falling on screen, dropping of device, etc). Even
though they are more expensive to purchase, the warranty and level of
service have made it all worthwhile. I will continue to be a loyal Asus
purchaser after this.

Sent from my Windows Mobile® phone.