PockeTwit – 0.74 Review

One of the things that I love about PockeTwit is that it is in constant development. One downside is that it is hard to know when is a good time to blog about it. Even though other good apps like Twikini have been launched since I last blogged, I still find myself going back to PockeTwit all the time. In fact, if I had a choice, I would use PockeTwit as my primary Twitter app instead of Tweetdeck only because it can do everything Tweetdeck can.

Outside of the features that amazed me in my first review like having a very usable user interface and integration with other providers like ping.fm, PockeTwit has recently included the concept of groups, saved searches, retweeting, showing a conversation chain and emailing someone a status. Some other nice things they have included are the ability to create and change themes and the ability to clear the cache if needed. Personally not high value to me personally but still good features.

The ability to have groups is certainly quite valuable. When I started using Twitter, I followed only a handful of friends. Since Twitter has a whole universe of interesting people, I’ve found myself following many more people since then. So the ability to group them is essential. It’s allows me to better focus on conversations in groups. The nice thing about PockeTwit is that when I assign them to a group, I can either copy them to a group or move them completely. I started out with copying fellow twitters to groups but I’m starting to realize moving them to groups makes more sense. Especially in a mobile form factor.

Being able to see a conversation is phoenomenal. Most mobile clients have this feature. I’m curious as to why most desktops don’t. It’s so nice to take a tweet and check out the history of the conversation. This is one of the reasons why moving a person instead of copying works in PockeTwit.

The other great part about PockeTwit is the ability to do a search and also re-run those searches later on. This implementation is less polished as how it is implemented is that it shows you the previous searches as part of a drop-down box. I guess it should more accurately be described as remembered searches instead of saved searches. I would have liked this to be accessible the way Groups are but I can understand why it’s implemented the way it is. I haven’t figured out how to delete searches from the drop-down list. So far it hasn’t been much of a problem because I don’t execute searches very often on my mobile device.

I personally believe that the reason why PockeTwit is such a phenomenal product is because the developer uses the app all the time. If I had a choice, I would want all of the features developed here on a desktop. Features like retweeting and emailing someone a status just makes sense. I also like being able to see the person’s timeline as well as profile. Given that it’s a mobile form factor, I like the fact that profile and timeline are separated out. Other niceties are that when I click on a tweet, it quickly separates out all of the things that I can interact with such as hyperlinks and profiles. Another sign of a great product is the ability to recognize when a feature isn’t as useful as originally imagined. In between my two reviews, there was a map feature where you could see where people were tweeting from. The feature was quickly recognized as not as useful as originally thought it would be and was removed. It was a good decision because I think that means that the developer can focus on core features instead of maintaining something obscure.

Overall, I am still in love with PockeTwit as my primary Twitter client for Windows Mobile

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Follow Friday – May 15, 2009 (aka the I LOVE LEWIN post)

One of the best suggestions someone (I think it was @flyingspatula) made about Follow Fridays is to actually suggest fewer but give reasons why. While there are very, very many people I really enjoy following, I wanted to keep this list small so that I could spend a little bit more time on highlighting why I follow each of these folks listed.

@Zoocasa – this is where I work! Primarily managed by Jason Lewin, this is the quickest way to find out what’s new and exciting about Zoocasa. I personally believe we have an awesome site if you’re looking for a home. Personally, we have a phenomenal team that makes this happen from day-to-day.

@JasonLewin – marketing guru extraordinaire. More importantly, an all around nice guy. Jason is the hardest working person on the team. He’s in early and out late. Well connected and always willing to share and introduce to others. Always willing to do anything that helps out the team or a team member out. A really classy guy. He had the ingenius idea of having me tweet something at the Realtor Quest show that ripped big benefits for our team but didn’t bother to take credit for it.

@saulcolt – the smartest man on earth. Saul is smart, witty and charming. There’s no wonder that he’s such a ladies’ man. What Saul doesn’t want you to know is that he’s really genuinely a nice guy. Despite the claim of having an enormous ego, he is humble, open and honest. Saul is all-kinds of awesome.

@flyingspatula – I share much of his views on management and leadership. It’s hard for many people to do either well. Management is getting the job done but it takes leadership to get the job done right. Getting the job done these days involve making sure the right things are done for the right reason and it’s a fine balance of people, objectives and technology for the most part.

@flexilis – Flexilis is a security product that I use for my Windows Mobile but they also tend to tweet about cool Windows Mobile news whenever relevant. I’ve used it many a time to save my bacon. Ironically enough the one feature that I use the most is Scream because I’m always leaving my phone somewhere.

@PockeTwitDev – I <3 PockeTwit. I don’t heart many things but I truly heart this app. If you use PockeTwit, be sure to follow @PockeTwitDev. It’s the fastest way to get support and feature requests for this app.

PockeTwit – Updated Review

I’ve been trying to get into microblogging a lot more lately as I find the concept fascinating. My microblog platform of choice is Twitter. Not so much because it’s a great platform but rather because it’s the one used the most and it has some interesting attached sevices like TwitPics. The cool thing about Twitter is that I’ve met at least one person that we share some things in common like BSG and our interest in HTC devices. She goes by the id of digital_jen these days. Anyway, I’ve used different Twitter apps like Twitterfox, PockeTwit,  Digsby, Yoono, Flock and Twitterberry comes to mind but I always seem to come back to PockeTwit as one of my two favourite Twitter tools.

PockeTwit is a Windows Mobile client for both the full and smartphone devices. At first pass, PockeTwit seems quite unintuitive to use. It screens is looks like it’s laid out poorly and it doesn’t use the soft keys that is now common to Windows Mobile devices. It took me a while to figure out that the developer uses a different paradigm for PockeTwit. Once I figured it out, it was very simple to use and very intuitive.

The way I think about the User Interface for PockeTwit is that there are 3 screens or levels. The first screen is the system screen. Over here you can have the following options:

sshot002 by you.

Errors
This is a new feature that alerts you when you run into network issues. From what I can see, it appears only when it occurs.

Friends Timelines

This is the most common feature used for me as it displays all your friends’ tweets.

Messages
This filters out your @replies and direct messages. I believe that the convention here seems to only filter out if @[your username] is the first thing of a tweet. I noticed that when my username was used in the middle of a sentence, it did not show up. Not sure if this is a problem with the Twiter API call or a PockeTwit problem.

Search/Local
I thought this was neat. This was the only client that allowed a search function. I don’t use this as much but it’s nice when I want to try to find out if something I’m interested in is being talked about.

Set Status
This is used to publish your status to your Microblogging site.

Settings
You can set up your various identities such as ping.fm or identi.ca. Also allows you to set up whether or not you want GPS to be turned on automatically or not.

About/Feedback
Gives you the version you’ve installed and the ability to check for new updates.

Exit
Not too exciting. Exit the application.

sshot001 by you.

The middle screen is the messaging screen where it’s filtered by the first screen. I didn’t notice this before but there’s a really tiny indicator on the right hand of the screen that indicates how far down in your messags you are. Typically pick either Friends Timeline or Messages. Press Enter or the Action key on your device. This will update the middle screen and you can use your right arrow key to bring your middle screen into full view.

sshot003 by you.

The last screen interacts with the person associated with the message on the middle screen. So let’s say that the message was sent by @someperson. If you scroll right from the middle screen you could see @someperson’s time line, reply using regular twitter, direct message @someone, make that message a favourite message, go to @someone’s profile page on the web, stop following a person and minimize the application.

There are a few quirks with PockeTwit. For one, the errors page is very much an anomaly. When you click on it, it takes you to a page that looks very different from the rest of the application. Now that I’m used to the UI, it makes absolute sense albeit a bit inconsistent. While I was writing about how I use the app, it was definitely quite apparent that I couldn’t write consistent rule of thumbs to a new user. However, once you start using it, it’s quite intuitive. A nice feature that I would like to have is the ability to do a manual update on top of the scheduled update.

The shortcomings of the application are for the most part cosmetic. It is even made even better by the fact that you know the developer uses his application constantly. He is responsive to both questions and suggestions. A prime example is that someone suggested that ping.fm would be a great addition to the app and within days, it was added to the app. Caveat though, not all suggestions make it into the app but at least the developer will consider it and test it before deciding whether or not it gets added to the final product. One other major benefit is that the application is open source. Overall, I really like the application. It works well, the developer is quite interactive and responsive on Twitter,

Sent from my Windows Mobile® phone.

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