HTC Flyer: Two months later

I thought I’d start this blog entry by jumping to a bit of a conclusion – I’ve given up on the HTC Flyer and am now using an Acer Iconia A500. Although I’m not using the HTC Flyer, I have to say that it is probably one of the best devices that I’ve used to date. A big part of why I really like the HTC Flyer is because of the form factor. WIth those things being said, let’s jump into the review of my fabulous HTC Flyer

Just a quick recap about the HTC Flyer – it’s a 7″ tablet from HTC and is pre-loaded with Android 2.3 or commonly known as Gingerbread. The hardware specs aren’t spectacular – it’s a single core 1.5 GHz processor, front-facing and rear-facing cameras, wi-fi only and weighing 420 grams. It is only one of a handful of 7″ Android tablets out there; the other notable ones are the Samsung Galaxy Tab and the Dell Streak. From a software perspective, there are a few software that it comes with – HTC Sense, Kids Mode, Reader, Notes Watch and Car Panel that are worth calling out.

The most unique feature of the HTC Flyer is the built-in N-Trig layer which combines a digitizer along with the standard capacitive screen allowing for very fine-grained writing with a stylus. Although the device comes with a weird connector, a standard micro-usb can be used to adequately charge the HTC Flyer. While this may not seem like much, in comparison to the other tablets, this is a really useful and desired hardware feature on any device. Although it doesn’t have a dual-core processor, the device works really well. There aren’t any moments when I feel like the HTC Flyer is under performing. There are a few really nice touches such as the buttons automatically lighting up depending on how you orient your screen.

There are a few things that irk me a little. One of them being that with a larger screen surface, I’m finding that the screen is smudging much more and that for some reason, the wi-fi tends to drop after a few days regardless of which wireless router I connect to. Also, like most HTC devices I’ve used to date, the camera leaves lots to be desired. However, one thing to note – it is not always the most convenient thing to take photos with a 7″ tablet.

While I’ve always felt that the HTC Sense software has always been mediocre at best for phones, I found myself liking it a lot for the HTC Flyer. I found it for some reason more usable than either ADW Launcher or Go Ex Launcher which I love on the HTC Desire Z. At the time I was using the HTC Flyer, the unlock screen was pretty unique – you could drag a ring towards one of 4 app icons to launch it directly from the lock screen. The one thing that HTC Sense has always been known for is their gorgeous widgets and the HTC Sense for the Flyer really is no different.

Notes is a bit unique – it’s an HTC-written app that integrates directly to Evernote. What is unique about this app is that it supports handwritten notes which is otherwise not supported by the standard Android Evernote app. It does some things really well including doing offline synchronization with Evernote but it also does some things really poorly such as it lacks the ability to display shared notebooks and the way it organizes notebooks isn’t exactly intuitive. Overall though, the application works well. One feature that would really differentiate it would be the ability to sync with other note taking apps like Spring Pad. Reader is like Notes from the perspective that it is written by HTC and synchronizes with a third-party service. In this case, the third party service is Kobo. Just like Notes, it would make itself a killer service if it could synchronize with other services like Amazon as well.

Car Panel is really a GPS app that is provided by Route 66. I have to say that I am a bit mixed about my experience with it. The features are surprisingly limiting especially given the maturity of GPS software today. It provides the most basic of features such as being able to search for a destination and routing to it. Some features that I would have loved to use would have included multi-destination and being able to edit my favourite destinations. Car Panel does well to integrate to the HTC Flyer but would have been nice to see it integrate with the Android ecosystem a bit better.

The very best thing about the HTC Flyer really is the form factor. I found myself loving that it was small enough to be portable but large enough to expand on how I use a mobile computing device. I would describe how I use the Flyer is that it is truly a mobile computing device for me. It is intentionally not a phone; I never feel compelled to lift it to my face to make a call. I would, however, happily and productively communicate with others through IM, email and DM. I would never feel compelled to take photos on it but it is quite a pleasure to view photos, movies and music on it. It is definitely a pleasure to write and read blogs on it. The most typical use case for me is to listen to music while reading or writing on it in transit. I also find it convenient to carry it in my back pocket of my jeans around the house although oddly enough I wouldn’t do the same with my phone. Another thing to consider about the form factor is that apps written for a 4″ device tends to scale really well to a 7″ form factor.

Overall, the HTC Flyer is my favourite tablet to date because of the form factor. I do like my Asus EEE EP-121 but it is limited to OneNote usage largely because Windows is still not yet a touchscreen friendly operating system. The HTC Flyer is the first Android device that I haven’t felt the need to root as it works really well out of the box. Also, HTC has promised to upgrade the Flyer to Honeycomb in the very “near” future.

I’ll post pictures of the HTC Flyer in a few days